November 2017 public holidays

Please note that our office will be closed the following dates in November 2017, for public holidays:

  • Friday – November 3 – Separation from Colombia
  • Monday – November 6 – November 5th is Colon Day, and as this falls on a Sunday, the public holiday is celebrated on Monday
  • Friday – November 10 – Panama remembers its Primer Grito de Independencia – its first cry for independence from Spain
  • Tuesday – November 28 – Independence from Spain

November 2017 public holidays – their meanings

In November, Panama celebrates a month of national festivities. Throughout November 2017, all around the country the flag and patriotic symbols are displayed (offices are draped with the flag or colors, most cars fly a small flag inside). There are four days of great historical importance for Panama in November.

The 3rd, 5th, 10th and 28th of November are public holidays, and as the 5th falls on a Sunday in November 2017, marches will be done on the Sunday, but the 6th will be a day off. The 2nd and 4th are also days on which school bands march and there are generally parades in all towns.  The celebrations these days are due to the separation of Panama from Colombia, the “cry” of independence and the independence from Spain, respectively.

In case you are unaware of the meaning of each of these public holidays, the following is a very short summary of what each day represents:

Separation from Colombia

Known as Separation Day, this holiday celebrates the independence of Panama from Colombia in 1903.  Panama came under Spanish control with the arrival of settlers in the 16th century. From 1538 until 1821 Panama was governed as part of the Viceroyalty of Peru. On 28 November 1821, Panama become independent from Spain as the region was a department within the Republic of Greater Colombia. In 1903, Colombia and Panama disagreed on whether the U.S. should be allowed to build a canal across Panama. With the support of the U.S., Panama broke away from Colombia on 3 November 1903.

Colon Day

Celebration of Colon Day is connected with the history of independence of Panama from Colombia. The USA assisted Panama in separation from Colombia, but the latter didn’t want to recognize independence of Panama. Officially Panama declared its independence on November 3, 1903, but the battle didn’t finish. The government of Colombia ordered the Army to march on Panama City. On November 3, 1903 the Panamanians had to stay their grounds in the city of Colon, that is a strategic place near the Caribbean Sea.

Primer Grito de la Independencia

This public holiday commemorates the beginning of Panama’s struggle for independence from Spain in 1821. Rufina Alfaro was a young woman who lived in a small village near Los Santos. On November 10, 1821 she led a group of Panamanians, shouting “Viva la Libertad” (Long live liberty).

People armed with sticks and stones seized Spanish barracks without spilling a single drop of blood. After the uprising, citizens of Azuero Peninsula declared their independence from Spain. Apparently a letter was also penned to the legendary Simon Bolivar, asking him for assistance in getting independence and complaining about the Spanish Governor.

Independence Day

On November 28th, Panama celebrates Independence from Spain. On November 28, 1821, eighteen days after Primer Grito de Independencia, Panama was declared a sovereign entity. This declaration said that Panama was free from the control of the Spanish Monarchy. It immediately thereafter decided to join “Gran Colombia” (fearing that Spain might attempt to retake the country).